Author: mappinginjustice

Mapping Feminicide

Helena Suárez Val
Centre for Interdisciplinary Methodologies
University of Warwick

Feminicide names the gender-related violent deaths of women, the tip of the iceberg in a continuum of violence that is “terrorising women” in the Americas (Fregoso and Bejarano 2010). Latin America and the Caribbean has been named “the most violent [region] in the world for women” (UNDP and UN Women 2017) and feminist activists have been responding to this ongoing crisis by intensifying activism on the issue. As well as mass protests, performances, hashtag campaigns, community organising, and other actions, feminist activists across Latin America have been denouncing feminicide by creating digital cartographies of the violence, including my own project mapping feminicide in Uruguay (feminicidiouruguay.net). In this short paper, I share an investigation where I put into dialogue affect and emotion theories, conceptualisations of feminicide, and scholarship that reclaims quantitative and geographic methods for feminist research and activism, to propose that digital maps of feminicide constitute feminist affect amplifiers: interactive digital artefacts through which data about cases of feminicide –modulated through feminist knowledges, emotions, and affects– are recirculated in/to the world. This practice of creating feminist data visualisations can be understood as part of an affective politics oriented to generating change in personal and political responses to feminicide. A politics hoping to end violence against women.

How Policymakers Make Sense of and Act On Mapping Data in Education Research

Jeremy Singer
Wayne State University

Sarah Winchell Lenhoff
Wayne State University

How might the use of maps shape policymakers’ interpretation and use of research? We answer this question through a reflective case study of policymaker and community member responses to education policy research that leverages mapping and geospatial analysis. Based on interviews with educational leaders and city officials, we discuss their relative attention to mapped data in the reports, the nature of conclusions that stakeholders drew from the maps, and the way in which their reading of maps interacted with their reading of the research as a whole. We found that our partners who were already concerned with the geography of absenteeism, exit, and mobility paid more attention to the maps; the maps encouraged our partners to think about collaborative and concrete solutions; and all our partners had a desire for more mapped data, especially in the form of digital and interactive maps. Policymakers may be especially compelled by geographic representations of educational issues and may adopt more concrete and solutions-oriented thinking when associating educational issues with specific places under their purview. Further, policymakers are likely to engage with digital maps that make geographic data more accessible and more interactive. Beyond simply including maps in research and policy reports, researchers can approach mapping as joint work with policymakers, using the process and products of geospatial analysis as an opportunity for ongoing engagement with policymakers.

Kelley Kreitz

Assistant Professor of English
Pace University


Paper Title
“Humanities Futures: Digital Mapping for Democratizing the Production of Knowledge”


Bio
Kelley Kreitz is assistant professor of English and affiliate faculty member in the Latinx Studies program at Pace University in New York City. She is also co-director of the university’s digital humanities center, Babble Lab. Her research on print and digital cultures of the Americas has appeared in American Literary History, English Language Notes, Revista de Estudios Hispánicos, and the digital mapping project C19LatinoNYC.org. She is working on a book that recovers the leading role played by U.S.-based Latin American writers in the media innovation of the 1880s and 1890s.

@kelley_kreitz
https://www.c19latinonyc.com/

W. Tanner Smoot

Graduate Student, Phd. History
Fordham University


Project Title
“The Siege of Antioch Project”


Bio
W. Tanner Smoot is a PhD graduate student of history at Fordham University. His area of focus centers around England during the Early and High Middle Ages. He is particularly interested in religious culture and monasticism.

https://medievaldigital.ace.fordham.edu/siegeofantioch/

William Scarfone

Postgraduate Researcher
Centre for Research Architecture, Goldsmiths


Paper Title
“A Tale of Two Cities: Sur Before and After”


Bio
William Scarfone is a researcher and filmmaker working critically and visually on issues of global asymmetry: military occupation, armed conflict in urban and rural environments, and liberation struggles. Other projects include “Free Derry: Negative Peace, Borders and Environmental Violence” with Avi Varna, in addition to a recently completed text and visual dissertation on Sur.

Timon McPhearson

Director
Urban Systems Lab, The New School


Paper Title
“Distributional Justice of Urban Environmental Quality: Mapping the Mismatches in Supply and Demand of Ecosystem Services in New York City”


Bio
Dr. Timon McPhearson is Director of the Urban Systems Lab and Associate Professor of Urban Ecology at The New School in New York City. He is a Senior Research Fellow at The Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies and Associate Research Fellow at Stockholm Resilience Centre. He is an IPCC Lead Author focusing on urban adaptation pathways in cities. In 2019 he was awarded the Sustainability Science Award and the Innovation in Sustainability Science Award by the Ecological Society of America. He is published widely in scientific journals (Nature, Nature Climate Change, Nature Sustainability, BioScience), books (e.g. Urban Planet), popular press (The Nature of Cities), and in the press (The New York Times, The Guardian, The Nation, New York Times Magazine, CityLab, Urban Omnibus, etc.)

@timonmcphearson
http://urbansystemslab.com

Roger Panetta

Visiting Professor of History
Fordham University


Paper Title
Digital Sing Sing: Specters of the Incarcerated


Bio
Roger Panetta Ph.D. is a retired history professor who taught at Fordham University. He edited Westchester: The American Suburb(Fordham University Press 2006) and Dutch New York: The Roots of Hudson Valley Culture (Fordham University Press 2009). He co-edited On Shattered Ground: A Civil War Mosaic (Penguin books 2013). He also co-authored The Hudson: An Illustrated Guide to the Living River (Rutgers University Press rev. second edition 2010) and authored The Tappan Zee and the Forging of the Rockland Suburb (Historical Society of Rockland County 2010) and Kingston: The IBM Years (Overlook Press 2014). He served as curator of the Hudson River Digital Collection at Fordham University and was elected to the New York Academy of History. He is currently working on The Inescapable Shadow: A History of the Original Sing Sing Cell Block 1825-1925 and The Rise of the Prison Museum in America.

Jaclyn Dudek

Instructional Designer
University of Alabama


Paper Title
“Mapping and placemaking to understand school segregation and integration”


Bio
Jaclyn Dudek is a Learning Sciences qualitative researcher focusing on learning-spaces and arts and humanities-focused informal learning. Jaclyn is also a learning, design, and technology specialist with over 10 years experience teaching and designing for higher educational contexts.

Gayatri Kawlra

PhD Student
Columbia University


Paper Title
“Ethics and/of Uncertainty: Urban Computing’s Synthetic People”


Bio
Gayatri Kawlra is a PhD student in Urban Planning at Columbia University. Her research explores the ways in which technologies of digital governance are transforming urban politics and issues of spatial justice, and their potential implications for cities in the Global South. Gayatri is also a Research Associate at Columbia World Projects, a recent initiative that aims to bring university research to the ground in the form of projects that have transformational potential, and is working alongside the Digital Identity and Elections Security project teams. Prior to joining her PhD program, Gayatri worked as a Strategy Analyst at the Rockefeller Foundation.

Anthony Buissereth

Executive Director
North Brooklyn Neighbors


Project Title
“ToxiCity: Mapping Pollution in North Brooklyn”


Bio
Anthony Buissereth joined North Brooklyn Neighbors as executive director in 2018. He has more than 14 years of nonprofit management, fundraising, program development, and government and community relations experience. A native New Yorker, he has worked at several nonprofit organizations including Youth Communication, Good Shepherd Services, and Cool Culture. He is a member of Brooklyn’s Community Board 3 where is vice-chair of the Landmarks and Preservation Committee and budget director. Anthony holds a bachelor’s degree from Syracuse University and a master’s degree from Long Island University – Brooklyn.

@buissereth
@nbklynneighbors
https://www.northbrooklynneighbors.org

Ariana Faye Allensworth

Member
Anti-eviction Mapping Project


Project Title
“NYC Evictions Map & Oral History Narratives Map of Displacement and Resistance”


Bio
Ariana Faye Allensworth is a cultural producer, photographer, and educator with roots in New York City and San Francisco. She currently oversees teen programs and neighborhood engagement at the International Center of Photography and helped launch the New York City chapter of the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project in 2017. She is passionate about bridging connections between cultural production and radical social change. She holds a Masters in Social Work from UC Berkeley and a BA in Urban Studies and African & African-American Studies from Fordham University.

Can Sucuoğlu

Interm Director
Pratt Institute, SAVI


Project Title
“ToxiCity: Mapping Pollution in North Brooklyn”


Bio
Can Sucuoglu graduated from YTU in 2005 and completed his M. Arch degree at Sci-Arc in 2007. Until 2010 Can worked at Jorge Pardo Sculpture, specializing in digital manufacturing. Can continued his career as a design coordinator at Warsaw Metro in Poland and became a partner at İyiofis in 2011. İyiofis has provided design services institutions and brands and has exhibited work in various biennials and exhibitions. In 2016 Can co-founded Bits ’n Bricks Research Group focusing on data-based design consultancy services to explore the potential of emerging digital technologies to improve the environments we design and live in.

https://commons.pratt.edu/savi/

Anna Rebrii

Independent Researcher


Project Title
“A Tale of Two Cities: Sur Before and After”


Bio
An independent researcher and journalist, Anna Rebrii reports on political and human rights situation in Turkey while engaging with local civil society organizations that address rights violations by the state against the Kurdish ethnic minority. She has published with openDemocracy, The Region and Jadalliyya.

Amir Sheikh

Affiliate Faculty
University of Washington – Bothell


Paper Title
Augmenting People’s Geographies of Seattle: Digital platforms as participatory methods


Bio
Amir Sheikh is a transdisciplinary urban environmental researcher, curator, and collaboration builder. He utilizes the tools of anthropology, geography, environmental science, historical inquiry, and arts-based collaboration to examine critical questions about our spatial relationships to landscapes, and their deeply intertwined narratives of place. He is a Curatorial Associate at the Burke Museum at the University of Washington where he is a team leader for The Waterlines Project. He is Affiliate Faculty at the University of Washington-Bothell where he is a program manager for the People’s Geography of Seattle Project. Previously at the University of Washington, he has contributed to a range of environmental modeling and urban planning projects from hyper-local scales to global development contexts, historical ecology research, and the development of place-based curricula bridging the environmental sciences, social sciences, and the humanities.

Tim Stallmann

Worker-Owner
Research Action Design


Project Title
“Durham Health Indicators Project”


Bio
Tim Stallmann is a cartographer based in Durham, NC. By day, he’s a worker-owner at Research Action Design, where he works with organizations and communities to co-design research, media and tech projects towards social change and collective liberation. His work focuses on the role maps and geographic data can play in addressing issues of racial, economic and environmental justice, especially stopping displacement and building neighborhood self-determination. Tim is a founding member of the Counter-Cartographies Collective, and a co-editor of the forthcoming A People’s Atlas of Detroit (Wayne State University Press, Fall 2019). He also loves to decorate cakes, and is still waiting for the right opportunity to make a map cake. 

@tim_maps
https://rad.cat

Susanna Horng

Clinical Associate Professor
NYU


Project Title
“Creative Cartography: The City as Site of Cultural Production”


Bio
Susanna Horng is a Clinical Associate Professor at New York University, where she teaches writing and cultural studies to undergraduates in Liberal Studies. Her digital pedagogy has been recognized by TWISA.

@susannahorng

Sava Saheli Singh

Post Doctoral Fellow
University of Ottawa


Project Title
“Vulnerable Bodies: Relations of visibility in the speculative smart city”


Bio
Sava is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Ottawa. Previously, as a postdoctoral fellow with the Surveillance Studies Centre (SSC) at Queen’s University, she co-created and produced ‘Screening Surveillance’ – a knowledge translation project for the Big Data Surveillance project. ‘Screening Surveillance’ is three short near-future fiction films that call attention to the potential human consequences of big data surveillance. Specifically, this project extends existing SSC work to examine the intersections and implications of big data systems, risk, and surveillance. Previously, Sava completed her PhD on Academic Twitter from New York University’s Educational Communication and Technology program. 

@savasavasava

Nerve Macaspac

Assistant Professor
CUNY College of Staten Island


Project Title
“Mapping Racial Capitalism: Gentrification and Legacies of Redlining in New York City”


Bio
Dr. Nerve Macaspac is a political geographer and GIS analyst. His research interests include legacies of redlining in contemporary NYC as a set of ongoing yet contested processes of the racialized production of space. He is completing a book manuscript from his earlier interdisciplinary research on the production and maintenance of community-led demilitarized geographic areas, popularly known as peace zones, in active armed conflicts. Nerve is an Asst. Professor at CUNY College of Staten Island where he teaches courses on Urban Geography and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). He curates and facilitates a Community Mapping Project at Woodbine, an experimental hub in Ridgewood, Queens. 

@DrNerveV
https://nervemacaspac.wordpress.com/

Manon Vergerio

Co-founder
Anti-Eviction Mapping Project NYC


Project Title
“NYC Evictions Map & Oral History Narratives Map of Displacement and Resistance”


Bio
Manon situates her work at the intersection of research, design, and organizing, drawing from her experience as a tenant organizer and housing activist in Brooklyn and San Francisco. She has an MS in Design & Urban Ecologies from Parsons School of Design at The New School and co-founded the NYC chapter of the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project, a data visualization and storytelling collective documenting gentrification and displacement.

https://www.manonvergerio.com

Lena Denis

Cartographic Assistant
Harvard University Library Map Collection


Project Title
“A Fine and Fertile Country: How America Mapped its Meals”


Bio
Lena Denis is the Cartographic Assistant at the Harvard University Map Collection, part of the Harvard Library system. She works on digital cartographic data and metadata of various kinds, and staffs the Map Collection Reference Desk several days a week. Her current projects focus on displaying cartographic materials as linked open data. 

@lenadenis

Kristen Hackett

Ph.D. Candidate
The Graduate Center, CUNY


Project Title
“Expanding Optics, Upending Illusions: Re(sident)-centering the development debate in LIC”


Bio
Kristen Hackett is a PhD candidate in the environmental psychology program at The Graduate Center, CUNY, a GC Digital Fellow in the Digital Scholarship Lab, and a co-coordinator of OpenCUNY, a academic platform made by and for GC students. She also works with the Justice For All Coalition, a group fighting for fair and decent housing and livable jobs in Western Queens. Her dissertation work examines how, why and to what ends residents in NYC are organizing through the lens of Western Queens, home of both the fastest growing neighborhood and the largest public housing development in the country.

@ka_hackett
https://kristenhackett.info

Orna Vaadia

Post Doctorate Fellow
Ben Gurion University, Israel


Paper Title
“Restoration of Erased Landscapes: Counter-Mapping and Memory Activism, the Case of the of Zochrt’s Nakba Map”


Bio
Dr. Orna Vaadia is a Post-doc at the Geography and Environmental Development, Ben Gurion University.  Her research field deal with issues related to critical cartography and the new spatial media and their use as resistance practices.

Christopher Rogers

Ph.D. Candidate
PennGSE


Project Title
“Mapping as Metaphor & Practice in Community-Immersive Teacher Education”


Bio
Christopher Rogers was born and raised in Chester, PA and is now a Ph.D Candidate within the Reading/Writing/Literacy program at PennGSE. He is a core member of Teacher Action Group Philadelphia, whose work consists of organizing teachers and other community educators to work toward education justice within the city of Philadelphia and beyond.

@justmaybechris

Anna Smith

Assistant Professor
Illinois State University


Project Title
“Mapping as Metaphor & Practice in Community-Immersive Teacher Education”


Bio
Dr. Anna Smith received her Ph.D. at New York University. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Secondary Education at Illinois State University, following an IES Postdoctoral Fellowship in Writing and New Learning Ecologies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is co-author of Developing Writers: Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age and co-editor of the Handbook of Writing, Literacies, and Education in Digital Cultures. Her recent research on writing development, transliteracies, and the intersection of teaching and learning can be found in journals such as Theory into Practice, Journal of Literacy Research, and Literacy.

@anna_phd
http://developingwriters.org

Abraham Avnisan

Assistant Professor
Kent State University


Project Title
“unARchived”


Bio
Abraham Avnisan is an experimental writer and new media artist whose work is situated at the intersection of image, text, and code. He creates mobile apps, new media installations and mixed reality performances that seek to subvert dominant narratives through embodied encounters with language, history, and philosophy. Abraham has exhibited his work at the Chicago Architecture Biennial, the Libraries at the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark, and the Vild med ORD literary festival in Aarhus, Denmark, among others. He holds an M.F.A in Poetry from Brooklyn College and an M.F.A. in Art and Technology Studies from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Abraham is an Assistant Professor at Kent State University.

@AbrahamAvnisan
https://abrahamavnisan.com

Helena Suárez Val

PhD Student
University of Warwick, Centre for Interdisciplinary Methodologies


Paper Title
“Mapping Feminicide”


Bio
Helena Suárez Val is a researcher, activist, and producer focused on human rights and feminism. She has worked as web developer and digital communications strategist with Amnesty International’s International Secretariat, the Global Call to Action against Poverty and Cotidiano Mujer, amongst others. She holds an MA in Gender, Media and Culture from Goldsmiths, University of London and is currently on a PhD programme at the Centre for Interdisciplinary Methodologies (CIM), University of Warwick. She is the creator of ongoing feminist activist cartography project Feminicidio Uruguay and co-hosts weekly podcast #InformativoFeminista de Nunca en Domingo with Elena Fonseca.

@ladelentes

Bryan Smith

Lecturer
James Cook University


Paper Title
“Visualising Everyday Colonial Commemoration: Digitally Mapping Settler-Colonial Commemoration”


Bio
Bryan Smith is a lecturer at James Cook University (Education). His work looks at how toponymic practices across settler contexts re-inscribe colonial commemorative landscapes and how critical engagements with this can help to reveal the banality of colonial logics of place and history. To support this, he develops Topomapper, a web based application that documents what critical toponymists call the “city-text” (the comemmorative naming practices) for a small Australian city.

https://bryanabsmith.com

Jennifer Pipitone

Assistant Professor of Psychology
College of Mount Saint Vincent


Paper Title
“Out of Bounds: Mapping Uptown Youth’s Everyday Mobility through Geotagged Photo-making”


Bio
Jennifer M. Pipitone is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at the College of Mount Saint Vincent in the Bronx. As an environmental psychologist and experiential educator, her research focuses on understanding human-environment relations in multicultural settings locally and abroad.  Her Environmental Psychology Lab engages with various qualitative and visual methodologies with the overarching goal of understanding ideas about difference. Situated at the nexus of Western youth culture and digital environments, Jennifer’s most recent research project assesses the thematic content of memes in order to explore what issues are representative of, and significant within, the current sociopolitical context.

https://mountsaintvincent.edu/academics/undergraduate-college/areas-of-study/all-areas-of-study/department-of-psychology/faculty/jennifer-pipitone/

Taylor Shelton

Assistant Professor
Mississippi State University


Paper Title
“Towards a situated mapping: visualizing urban inequality between the god trick and strategic positivism”


Bio
Dr. Taylor Shelton is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Geosciences at Mississippi State University. Taylor is a broadly-trained human geographer whose research focuses on how urban spaces and social inequalities are represented, reproduced and contested through data. In particular, he is interested in using mapping and data visualization to produce alternative understandings of urban socio-spatial inequalities, especially as it relates to issues of housing and property ownership. Taylor earned BA and MA degrees in geography from the University of Kentucky and his PhD from the Graduate School of Geography at Clark University.

@kyjts
http://www.taylorshelton.info

Will Payne

PhD Candidate, Geography
UC Berkeley


Paper Title
“Gourmet Gentrification: Mapping Elite Tastes Along New York’s Consumption Frontier, 1990-2015”


Bio
Will Payne is a PhD candidate in Geography at UC Berkeley, where he is also affiliated with the Berkeley Center for New Media and the Berkeley Global Urban Humanities Initiative. Will is researching the parallel evolution of location-based media and elite consumption cultures, from the “crowdsourcing” pioneer the Zagat Survey in the 1980s to contemporary applications like Yelp, Foursquare, and Google Maps/Local. He is interested in how these technologies and practices have helped to transform urban neighborhoods through a process of “algorithmic gentrification,” with a focus on New York and San Francisco as sites of experimentation and dissemination.

@willbpayne
https://geography.berkeley.edu/will-payne

Idil Onen

Data Team Member
Portrait of Unbelonging


Paper Title
“A Tale of Two Cities: Sur Before and After”


Bio
Idil Onen is a historian who has been working on Turkish state violence, nationalist ideologies and ethnic and religious communities. She is currently a data member of Portrait of Unbelonging under the supervision of Dr. Zeynep Devrim Gursel. Portrait of Unbelonging is a public facing digital humanities project which examines the migration pattern of the Armenian diaspora. She has been working to develop a digital mapping project that aims to visualize the destruction of  the UNESCO World Heritage site Sur, Diyarbakir during and after the military operations carried out by the Turkish government against its Kurdish population in 2015-2016.

Veronica Olivotto

PhD Student
The New School, Urban Systems Lab


Paper Title
“Justice in Coastal Cities: A Comparative Study of Six New York City Community Districts”


Bio
Veronica Olivotto is a researcher, teacher and consultant working on urban climate change adaptation and risk reduction with a keen interest in the politics of decision making in climate resilience at multiple scales. She is currently pursuing a PhD in Public and Urban Policy at the New School of New York, and an associate at the Institute for Housing and Urban Development Studies (IHS) based in Erasmus University Rotterdam (The Netherlands). In the past, Veronica worked on climate change related assignments and training for the German Development Agency (GIZ), the European Commission and various branches of the United Nations. She is an author and member of the Urban Climate Change Research Network (UCCRN). Veronica holds degrees from Erasmus University Rotterdam (M.Sc Urban Management and Development, 2010), Edinburgh-Napier University (M.Sc Ecotourism, 2007) and Milan University (B.A. Tourism and Local Community, 2005). 

@V_Olivotto

Bryan Mann

Assistant Professor
University of Alabama


Paper Title
“Mapping and placemaking to understand school segregation and integration”


Bio
Bryan Mann is an Assistant Professor of Educational Policy and Foundations at the University of Alabama. His research explores the effects that school choice and alternative models of education have on various aspects of schooling ecosystems. This research especially focuses on how these models relate to equity in student enrollment placements and how school leaders and policymakers interpret and respond to choice-based developments in their own settings. Dr. Mann received his Ph.D. in Educational Theory and Policy from the Pennsylvania State University.

@bmann_edu

Debra Mackinnon

Post Doctoral Fellow 
University of Calgary


Paper Title
“Vulnerable Bodies: Relations of visibility in the speculative smart city”


Bio
Debra Mackinnon began a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Calgary in July 2019. Her research explores the intersections of smart cities, governance, and (in)justice. She completed her PhD in Sociology at Queen’s University in 2019. Her PhD titled “Mundane Surveillance: Mobile Applications and Accounting in Business Improvement Areas”, examines the adoption and use of smarter urban technologies for asset management in Canadian Cities. 

Svetlana Jović

Assistant Professor
SUNY Old Westbury


Paper Title
“Out of Bounds: Mapping Uptown Youth’s Everyday Mobility through Geotagged Photo-making”


Bio
Svetlana Jović is an Assistant Professor of developmental psychology in the Psychology Department at SUNY Old Westbury. She is a sociocultural psychologist with expertise in diverse methods of critical sociocultural analysis, including narrative, sociolinguistic, visual, and spatial analysis. Dr. Jović’s research concerns socio-cognitive development among children and youth in challenging contexts, including poverty, migration, cultural diversity, and integration. Through acknowledging the detrimental effects of the socioeconomic (and political) challenges that many children and youth—especially the underrepresented—experience, Dr. Jović’s work emphasizes the socio-cognitive advantages that young people growing up in adversity acquire.

https://www.oldwestbury.edu/people/jovics

Rita Lambert

Senior Teaching Fellow
University College London, The Bartlett Development Planning Unit


Paper Title
“An ethnography of cartographic practices to unravel the hidden”

Project Title
“Participatory Mapping to Reduce Urban Risk in Lima”


Bio
Dr. Rita Lambert is an urban development planner and architect originally from Ethiopia. She is a senior teaching fellow at The Bartlett Development Planning Unit, UCL and a co-investigator on several research projects in Africa and Latin America. Her research focuses on the relationship between planning, informality and spatial knowledge production, manipulation and circulation as well as the development of participatory tools that can be adopted by ordinary citizens to navigate institutional barriers and expand the room for maneuver towards socio-environmentally just urbanization.

https://iris.ucl.ac.uk/iris/browse/profile?upi=RCLAM63

Fatima Koli

Technical Instruction Lead
Barnard College, Columbia University


Paper Title
“(Un)Privileging the Map: A Community Collaboration in Understanding Economic Security”


Bio
Fatima Koli is the Technical Instruction Lead for the Empirical Reasoning Center at Barnard College, where she develops training on empirical methods that incorporate critical understandings of data. She is also currently a Masters Data Science student at Columbia, studying at the intersection of data science, public policy, and cartography. Her interests lie in the ethics of data analysis and in racial justice, particularly through the lens of the criminal justice system and the War on Terror.  

@fatima_koli
https://fatimakoli.github.io

Pablo Herreros Cantis

Research Associate
The New School, Urban Systems Lab


Paper Title
“Distributional Justice of Urban Environmental Quality: Mapping the Mismatches in Supply and Demand of Ecosystem Services in New York City”


Bio
Pablo Herreros is an urban ecologist focused on merging ecological and socioeconomic data to inform urban planners about issues related to environmental justice and climate change adaptation. With New York City as data laboratory, he relies on spatial data science to produce visually impactful maps that report on the distribution of environmental risks and services across different socioeconomic groups. He recently graduated from the MSc programme Urban Environmental Management in Wageningen University, and is currently a research associate at the Urban Systems Lab. 

https://www.linkedin.com/in/pablo-herreros-cantis/

Charisse Gulosino

Visiting Professor/Scholar
UC Berkeley


Paper Title
“Geography of Charter School Opportunity: The Case of New York City Subway Lines and Education Deserts”


Bio
Charisse Gulosino, an Associate Professor in the Leadership and Policy Studies Program at the University of Memphis, received her Doctorate in Education from Teachers College, Columbia University. Charisse was a Postdoctoral Research Associate and a faculty member of the Alfred Taubman Center for Public Policy and American Institutions at Brown University. Charisse is currently a Visiting Scholar/Professor in the Graduate School of Education and the Center for Policy Analysis for California Education (PACE) at University of California, Berkeley. Her research focuses on the evaluation of educational policies and programs with a specific interest in school choice that enhance education access, equity, efficiency and results-based accountability. She has applied geospatial, financial and organizational behavior analyses to the study of charter schools in metropolitan education markets.

https://sites.google.com/site/charissegulosino/

Lauri Goldkind

Associate Professor
Fordham University


Paper Title
“Rights based data practice: data justice in virtual spaces and on the ground”


Bio
Dr. Goldkind is an associate professor at Fordham’s Graduate School of Social Service as well as the Editor in Chief of the Journal of Technology in Human Services. Dr. Goldkind’s current research has two strands: technology adoption in the human services and the social justice and ethics implications of data collection, use and dissemination in community based organizations. Dr. Goldkind was in residence at the United Nations University Institute on Computing and Society, located in Macau, SAR, China from June to August 2017 with plans to return in the Fall of 2019.  

@brooklyn11210
http://www.laurigoldkind.net

Jason Douglas

Assistant Professor
Chapman University


Paper Title
“Participatory mapping for community empowerment and health equity”


Bio
Jason A. Douglas, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the Department of Health Sciences, Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences, at Chapman University. He works with community residents and organizations in participatory research contexts to investigate social and environmental determinants of health disparities in disadvantaged communities. 

@JADouglasPhD
https://www.chapman.edu/our-faculty/jason-douglas

Craig Dalton

Assistant Professor
Hofstra University


Paper Title
“Who’s map? Everyday actions of spatial data resistance”


Bio
Dr. Dalton’s work focuses on web-based geotechnologies and social justice applications in our everyday lives. This work seeks to understand the power geometries, political economies, and cultural priorities that underlie geographic technologies, posing questions about the limits of current geotechnologies and GIS, the ethical conundrums they raise, and the possibilities of better technological relationships. Currently, he is collaborating with Jim Thatcher (Univ. of Washington-Tacoma) to develop a socially situated, contextualized approach to personal location data and resistance data practices. Dr. Dalton also studies and engages in counter-mapping and GIS for social justice, often with a local or regional orientation. 

https://www.hofstra.edu/faculty/

Meghan Cope

Professor
University of Vermont


Paper Title
“Mapping Critical Historical Geographies of Childhood”


Bio
Meghan Cope explores historical geographies of American childhoods through a social justice lens. She specializes in qualitative research, archives, and creative mappings to learn about the geographic meanings and processes that matter to socially and economically marginalized groups.

@geomeg
http://blog.uvm.edu/mcope-childhoods/

Dare Brawley

Assistant Director, Center for Spatial Research
M.S. Urban Planning Candidate
Columbia University, GSAPP


Paper Title
“Ethics and/of Uncertainty: Urban Computing’s Synthetic People”


Bio
Dare Brawley is a researcher and designer. She is Assistant Director of the Center for Spatial Research at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University where she is also a degree candidate for the M.S. in Urban Planning. Her work focuses on the interactions of technology, urban governance, and spatial politics using methods from critical urban studies and geographic information systems. Her work has been exhibited and published by the Venice Architecture Biennale, Storefront for Art and Architecture, The Architectural League, and the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy.

@darebrawley

Adam Arenson

Associate Professor of History, Director of Urban Studies Program
Manhattan College


Paper Title
“Slavery in the Bronx: Mapping, Advocacy, and Genealogy in a Digital Public History Project”


Bio
Adam Arenson is Associate Professor of History and the Director of Urban Studies at Manhattan College. He is the author of two award-winning books, The Great Heart of the Republic: St. Louis and the Cultural Civil War (Harvard, 2011) and Banking on Beauty: Millard Sheets and Midcentury Commercial Architecture in California (Texas, 2018), and co-editor of Civil War Wests and Frontier Cities. He has taught Slavery in the Bronx as a community-engaged learning course. His current research, After the Underground Railroad, is a political, economic, and family history of African North Americans crossing the U.S.-Canada border, 1860-1930. Learn more at http://adamarenson.com.

@adamarenson
https://adamarenson.com/teaching/

Christian Anderson

Associate Professor
University of Washington Bothell


Paper Title
“Augmenting People’s Geographies of Seattle: Digital platforms as participatory methods”


Bio
My scholarly work is situated at the intersections of human geography, urban studies, cultural studies, and critical social thought. Integrating approaches from across these fields and using place-based ethnographic and participatory methods in particular, I explore how ordinary, routine practices and taken for granted or ‘common sense’ conceptions of the world are—in and through their embeddedness in space—bound up with broader formations of urbanized culture, power, social reproduction, and political economy. 

Bree Akesson

Associate Professor
Wilfrid Laurier University


Paper Title
“Mapping stories: Using GPS as an ethnographic approach to socio-spatial research with families displaced by war”


Bio
Bree Akesson is an Assistant Professor at Wilfrid Laurier University’s Faculty of Social Work and the Associate Director of the Centre for Research on Security Practices. Her research program ranges from micro-level understandings of the experiences of children and families to macro-level projects to strengthen social welfare and mental health systems in crisis-affected countries. 

@bree_akesson
http://www.outofplaceresearch.com